Statement on July 16, 2018, meeting of the SIU Board of Trustees

As I have said in the past, I believe that system leadership questions were between the board and the president. I am pleased these questions have been resolved.

I look forward to working with Dr. Dorsey, our colleagues at Edwardsville and the Board of Trustees to reinforce and build on the strengths of the SIU system and its campuses.

I also look forward to continuing the acceleration of the advancement of SIU Carbondale in collaboration with our strong faculty, staff, alumni, friends and community members. While there is work to be done, we have much to be proud of. I look forward to celebrating past achievements and future directions when we mark our 150th anniversary next year.

Moving forward on a new academic structure

On Tuesday, the Faculty Senate approved RMEs, or program change plans, for six proposed new schools, another step forward in the revitalization of our academic structure. The schools are:

  • Applied Engineering and Technology.
  • Biological Sciences.
  • Computing.
  • Earth Systems and Sustainability.
  • Health Sciences.
  • Psychology and Behavioral Sciences.

A special senate committee that is conducting initial reviews of the program change plans has asked the provost’s office for more information or modifications related to four other plans.

I greatly appreciate the time and effort that faculty members have invested in their thoughtful review of the program change plans. I am also grateful for the work of the provost’s office under the leadership of Interim Provost Meera Komarraju, who has been shepherding the process since her appointment in April.

We have posted an update of where each school is in the process, and we will also post an update on the full structure as it stands, even as it continues to evolve, in the days ahead.

Continuing our revitalization efforts

While there are important steps still ahead of us and we are still discussing several proposals submitted as alternatives, I’m pleased that through this collaborative process, our re-envisioning of our academic programs is beginning to take shape.

Similarly, our other revitalization efforts, many outlined in April’s eight-month update, continue moving forward. A few examples:

  • We continue to work on the concept of a makerspace to support student research, innovation and creativity. Science Dean Scott Ishman is now leading the initiative.
  • We are also formalizing an e-sports, or electronic sports, initiative. E-sports are popular with students and provide opportunities for friendly competition on campus and with other institutions.
  • We continue to work on fall 2018 enrollment. About 250 new students are expected at Saturday’s freshman orientation, and active outreach and support continues for both admitted and returning students who have not yet registered for classes. While we know enrollment will be down, it will be down less than we anticipated eight months ago due to the diligence and efforts of the enrollment management and student affairs teams, as well as our faculty, staff and academic leaders in our departments, schools and colleges. The SIU Foundation and SIU Alumni Association also stepped forward, providing resources to support recruitment efforts. We continue to take every step possible to both to minimize the decline and position ourselves for future years.
  • In fact, all hands are also on deck to launch the recruitment cycle for fall 2019. We are deploying new strategies and materials and reinforcing everything we do. Open house numbers continue to rise, a signal that we are projecting a renewed energy at SIU. As I’ve said before, enrollment will not rebound overnight or even in a year, but we can make steady progress if we remain focused on our goals.
  • Finally, we are preparing to announce our fundraising results for fiscal year 2018. While I won’t spoil the announcement, I can share that donor support of SIU increased by about 25 percent over the previous year. I thank all of our alumni, friends, faculty and staff who demonstrate their confidence in SIU and support our students through their gifts.

Looking ahead

With so much happening in the world around us, it might be easy to become distracted from our mission. I remain confident that our outlook is positive and we have much to be proud of.

Every day, I learn about faculty whose work brings credit to our reputation and students who are finding success because of the many opportunities they find at SIU. These are the real stories that speak to who we are as a university. Please join me in telling them.

Making a difference in Southern Illinois

When faculty research leads to community impact, everyone benefits. Two grants provide strong examples of how research supported by external funding helps us fulfill our mission.

Helping STEM teachers

A recent grant from the National Science Foundation will help SIU continue to enhance the teaching of STEM subjects to junior high and high school students in Southern Illinois and beyond. SIU faculty from multiple disciplines will work with selected teachers, who will conduct summer research projects and participate in other professional development activities.

The newly trained “master teacher leaders” will in turn share their knowledge with other teachers, expanding the number of content experts in schools. The ultimate goal is to enhance science, technology, engineering and mathematics education and draw students into STEM fields.

Karen Renzaglia, plant biology, is principal investigator on the grant. Her co-investigators include SIU experts in plant biology, zoology, teacher leadership, effective STEM pedagogy and sustainability and environmental science.

Reducing gun violence

Tammy Kochel sits near her computer
Tammy Kochel, associate professor of criminology and criminal justice at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, receives a grant in partnership with the Springfield Police Department to start a focused deterrence program. The program works to decrease gun-related violence in the community. (Photo by Steve Buhman)

A joint, three-year grant to SIU and the Springfield police department addresses gun violence through a “focused deterrence” program that can serve as a model for other communities. The goal is to connect with individuals who are past or potential gun offenders and help them find an alternative path.

In June, following a year of research and planning by Tammy Kochel of SIU’s criminology and criminal justice faculty and her students, eight individuals participated in an interventional meeting and heard first-hand about the impact of gun violence. At the end of the meeting, they were given resources to assist them.

“That might be getting a GED, help getting a job, daycare, housing, mental health, substance abuse — a whole range of possible services,” according to Dr. Kochel.

Improving communities

Both of these projects improve our communities through the creation and exchange of knowledge – helping us fulfill the promise of our mission statement. These are just two examples of the outstanding work our faculty members undertake every day on behalf of Southern Illinois.

Statement regarding documents released by SIU system

A story in today’s Southern Illinoisan reviews documents outlining behind-the-scenes conversations about the recent reallocation proposal. While I was aware of some of this information, the deeper backstory is both disheartening and disturbing on a professional and personal level. I believe SIU Carbondale deserves far better and fairer treatment as a partner in the SIU system.

However, I also continue to believe that these issues must be resolved between the board and system leadership. For our part, SIU Carbondale will continue to focus on its mission and revitalization of both the university and the region. I will continue to represent the community to the very best of my ability.

I remain committed to our positive future and will continue to work to build upon SIU’s academic strengths and to establish Southern Illinois as a region of innovation focused on economic development. I fully believe we will achieve our goals to advance SIU as the second jewel in the crown of higher education in Illinois. I welcome your continued support.

Discoveries and inventions demonstrate the Saluki spirit

Two men work at a computer
Southern Illinois University Carbondale computer science senior Ayush Kohli, seated, and Amiangshu Bosu, assistant professor of computer science, work in a computer lab. Kohli recently won third place at the Association of Computer Machinery’s Student Research Competition world final, a prestigious, international event, featuring the work of 17 regional ACM student research competition champions.

Our mission statement refers to “innovation in research and activity” and “nurturing student success.” We accomplish both through emphasis on student research.

In fact, studying at a major research institution confers a wealth of benefits upon our students. They are constantly pushed to explore real-world problems and come up with practical solutions.

The result is a level of leadership and innovation that never fails to impress.

Innovation recognized on a national level

For instance, two Salukis were recently recognized for their creations.

Ayush Kohli, a senior earning a degree in computer science, earned an award from the Association of Computer Machinery’s Student Research Competition for an app he designed. The app, DecisionDroid, uses machine learning to help identify malicious and pirated apps for Android devices.

Tessa Barnes, a junior in industrial design, gained recognition for her design of a prosthetic device that could be used by musicians to play brass instruments. Her device would give its users much better mobility than similar devices currently on the market.

New revelations about our history

SIU students were at the forefront of the discovery of a new American fort on the site of Fort Kaskaskia. Archeology classes have been conducting hands-on research in the area since last year, and had trouble reconciling their findings with the historical record, which said that U.S. troops inhabited a French fort five decades after it was abandoned.

This year, they found that the U.S. troops had, in fact, built a completely new fort approximately 300 meters from the French fort. The discovery opens a whole new avenue of research on the site.

These are just a few examples of the recent contributions SIU students have made. Our campus is full of inventors, entrepreneurs and leaders. I’m excited to hear about the next big breakthrough.

Statement from Carlo Montemagno

As many of you know, I have recently curtailed my public schedule in order to address significant back and hip pain. The pain was originally thought to be cysts that have now been treated, thanks to the great team at SIH. With their help, I am feeling much better.

However, as often happens in these cases, I have more treatments ahead to address the cause of the cysts, which has now been identified as cancer.  I won’t go into more detail here other than to say we are treating it aggressively and I am confident that I will be around for a long time.

While I may not be as visible in the weeks ahead, I will remain fully engaged as your chancellor and will remain focused on advancing our institution.  We are on the right track.  During the past year, we have built a strong management team who will step up when called upon during this time.

I assure you that all of our work revitalizing the university continues. Earlier this year, Provost Meera Komarraju and her office assumed full responsibility for facilitating academic reorganization. I am grateful for her leadership and for the work of our faculty.

Health is an intensely personal matter for all of us, and I felt it was important to be transparent with you, our new extended family, regarding this matter.  My family and I appreciate the support of our many friends and colleagues here in Carbondale, and around the world.

Thank you for your support and for all you do for this great university.  I look forward to celebrating our many future successes with you.

Fulfilling our mission through partnerships

Historically, public universities have received nearly 100 percent of their resources from state funds and tuition. Declines in state appropriations – more than 23 percent for SIU between the 2001 and 2018 fiscal years – have been offset over the years by increases in tuition and fees.

Clearly, this is a pattern that cannot continue. The future of SIU cannot rely on these two primary funding sources alone.

And while resources from our generous donors are critically important and make a very positive difference, their use is typically restricted to specific areas of the university that align with the interests of the donor. Private donations cannot fill the gaps made by declines in either state funding or tuition.

However, we have an alternative.

The value of partnerships

Strategic partnerships between SIU, industry and the economic development arms of our state and federal government can support academic programs and research to benefit faculty and students.

For example, partnerships with our incredible agricultural base have the potential to provide a capital investment in our farms in support of both teaching and research. There are similar opportunities in the STEM fields, the fine arts, health fields and many other areas.

Win-win-win

University/industry/government partnerships have many benefits.

Industry and government partners can help ensure that future employees are well prepared. Partners also welcome access to extraordinarily well-trained graduates. They may also want to be on the front end of new discoveries that will change how they operate or better serve constituents. The university benefits by attracting and deploying resources that support its mission, its community, its faculty and its students.

Everyone wins.

We’ve already started

Last week, I wrote about existing and future economic development partnerships, but there are many other examples already in place at SIU.

The Advanced Coal and Energy Research Center has received $4.6 million in funds from the energy sector to better use coal resources and transition to new energy sources in Illinois.  The “energy boost” grant provides faculty and facilities support for energy/industry research and also trains our students through scholarships.

The Center for Embedded Systems is one of our best examples of a government/industry/SIU partnership that translates to instant jobs for our students. In fact, Intel is one of our top employers.

Like Intel, many industry partners are looking for ways to grow a pipeline of well-prepared future employees.

For example, Navistar International Corp. donated nine commercial trucks to our automotive technology program, and Rush Enterprises, Inc., supported the partnership by providing licenses to software that allows students to configure and program truck body controllers.

Michael Behrmann, chair of automotive technology, discusses the benefits of donations by Navistar International Corp. and Rush Enterprises, Inc. to the program.

Similarly, the U.S. Navy donated a Gulfstream III airplane to our aviation technologies program.

Identifying strategic partners

Partnerships can provide an influx of resources that will allow us to thrive and grow. I believe that we have the potential to grow the number of industry and government partnerships significantly to benefit our students and faculty while preserving the integrity of our mission.

We need to be intentional about identifying partners whose interests align with our mission and programs. We have several conversations underway now. I encourage our faculty to identify and work with the university to explore partnership opportunities that will help move us forward.

I look forward to hearing your ideas.

Opportunity zone to support local economic development

Research Park on the SIU Campus

SIU remains attuned to ways we can support our regional and local economies. Being part of a newly designated “opportunity zone” will give us one more avenue to have a positive impact.

The new opportunity zone program is based on the Federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. The act allows individuals and organizations to receive tax benefits for making a long-term investment in job creation in designated “zones.”

Governor Rauner recently announced more than 325 zones across Illinois, and much of SIU, including the Research Park, is located within one of them. This designation will allow us to work with local businesses to attract and support investors to our area.

While the details related to the process for investing in and seeking investments for opportunity zones are still pending, this is promising news for SIU and our region.

Other examples

There are many, many other ways we support economic development as we fulfill our mission as a regional economic catalyst.

Our Small Business Development Center has a long history providing local business owners with the tools and guidance they need for success. The center also advises people interested in starting or expanding a business. Last year, the center advised more than 222 clients and helped entrepreneurs create 28 new businesses.

SIU is currently partnering with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to assist with strategic planning for the World Shooting Complex and Pyramid State Park.

And our long-term partnership with the non-profit IMEC helps small- to mid-sized manufacturers in Southern Illinois improve operations, processes and training.

These are just some of the examples of the ways we support economic growth in Southern Illinois.

Partnerships like these can make a tremendous positive difference for our community. In fact, partnerships are key to fulfilling our vision for the entire university. Stay tuned for more on this subject next week.

Mission accomplishing

“SIU embraces a unique tradition of access and opportunity, inclusive excellence, innovation in research and creativity, and outstanding teaching focused on nurturing student success. As a nationally ranked public research university and regional economic catalyst, we create and exchange knowledge to shape future leaders, improve our communities, and transform lives.”

SIU’s mission statement tells us a lot about where we have been, who we are and where we are going. It speaks to our commitment to access, our focus on innovation, and the quality of our faculty and the education we provide. It proudly declares our status as a national research university and our dedication to our region.

Telling our story

We have a lot of great stories to tell about how we are fulfilling our mission, from a forthcoming diversity plan to a new $2.2 million National Science Foundation grant to create master teachers in STEM fields (stay tuned for the announcements!) to the success of our students at SIU and as alumni. Over the course of the summer, I will use this blog to feature just a few of the stories showing how we are embodying each aspect of our mission statement. I also welcome hearing your own stories about how we are shaping future leaders, improving our communities and transforming lives.

I hope you are also telling the university’s story – and touting the many successes of our students and faculty – wherever you go. We have much to be proud of, and every person we can share our pride with will help us spread the good word even further.

A work in progress

It’s rewarding to know that our own constituents clearly supported our mission in the Vision 2025 survey conducted last fall. Their support gives me confidence that we have a shared vision for the university’s future and that we can indeed work together to achieve it.

Of course, we will never truly be done accomplishing our mission. It’s an ongoing process, and each of us must work every day, make every decision, and enter every conversation with our mission in mind. I pledge my commitment to doing so, and I welcome all you do to support our mission in word and in deed.

Summer programs enhance education

I am a strong believer in the benefits of hands-on and experiential learning. SIU offers a number of unique opportunities to participate in research and creative activities starting in a student’s freshman year.

These opportunities extend beyond the SIU campus. This summer, many of our students are gaining invaluable experience and knowledge by participating in countless internships. Others are traveling around the world to learn about other cultures in study abroad programs.

Internships help students burnish their resumes

I’ve seen many recent college grads lamenting online about the difficulties of landing a new job without experience. Luckily, many Salukis are putting themselves at the head of the pack by taking on summer internships.

For instance, Emily Buice, a junior in our communications studies program, is on her way to Brussels, Belgium, for an internship with the public affairs department of the U.S. Mission to the European Union.

And Emma Rients, a junior studying Animal Science, will be one of five students in Illinois to join the new I-BELIEF (Illinois Beef Experiential Learning and Industry Exposure Fellowship) program.

Several SIU students also spent the legislative session in Springfield this year, thanks to a handful of internships offered through the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute. These students include Oneida Vargas, Joshua McCray, Darrin Reinhart and Michael Smith, and Sarah Farwick and Gabby Robles.

While summer might seem like the perfect time to complete an internship, these opportunities are available year-round. Students sometime connect with employers on their own, but most find internships through their individual colleges, schools and departments or the Career Development Center.

I encourage every student to explore the options and take advantage of these great learning experiences.

Study abroad programs expand student horizons

Our students are also fanning across the globe this summer to take advantage of numerous study abroad programs under the guidance of SIU faculty.

One of the most popular recurring opportunities is the College of Business study abroad program in France, taking place from May 13 through June 10. This is the 16th  year for the program, which is conducted in partnership with the Grenoble Graduate School of Business. Participating graduate students can earn a certificate in innovation, design thinking and intrapreneurship.

Students in another popular program, the Messages from Hiroshima: Global Peace Education program recently returned from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, where they took a deeper look at the history and politics behind nuclear technology and the Pacific Theater of World War II.

Global seminars are also being held in Greece, Spain, Cuba, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Germany and Egypt.

So, whether getting practical experience to build up their resumes, traveling the world to immerse themselves in other cultures, or both, Salukis aren’t resting on their laurels this summer. I can’t wait to hear about all your great experiences.